Defensive Backs

Outlet anbefaler

Under Armour 1289577 Compression Legging

Under Armour 1289577 Compression Legging

Under Armour's classic compression short with an extended 10-inch inseam. HeatGear® fabric and a...

kr 486,00

 

Outlet anbefaler

Under Armour 1274511 Tech Popover Henley

Under Armour 1274511 Tech Popover Henley

kr 576,00

 

Outlet anbefaler

Under Armour 1302294 Rival Fitted Graphic Hoddy

Under Armour 1302294 Rival Fitted Graphic Hoddy

kr 576,00

 

Outlet anbefaler

NFL - League Logo Cap 5950

NFL - League Logo Cap 5950

kr 449,00

 

Outlet anbefaler

Baltimore Ravens - Sideline Knit

Baltimore Ravens - Sideline Knit

Become the #1 fan in the land when you get this Official Sport knit hat from New Era. Team graphics ...

kr 384,00

 
Se alt

Even though defensive backs (DBs) are often among the smallest players on the field, their impact on the game is huge. Teams without good defensive backs, are easily victimized by their opponents passing attack. On the other hand, great DBs make life really hard for an offence. Since the threat of game changing interceptions, can scare a quarterback from throwing deep, and cause an offensive coach to be more conservative.

 

There are two distinctly different defensive backs: Cornerbacks (CB) and Safeties (S).

 

A Cornerback plays on the edges, near the sidelines, directly across from the Wide Receivers. It is his responsibility to cover the fastest players on the offence, and prevent them from catching the football. The Corner must follow his man closely and once the ball is thrown, break on it to knock it down. If he is in a good position the corner can try to catch the ball and return it the other way – every defensive back dreams of making these interceptions. A great CB like Deion Sanders could effectively close down almost half of the field, making life a lot easier for the rest of the defense.

 

The safety patrols the deep middle of the field. He must assist the CBs in covering the WRs, and is in a good position to read the QB and make interceptions. But where the corners use speed to cover their men, the safeties can use a different weapon – the big hits. A safety often has great opportunities to smash the WRs as they reach for the ball, and if a physical player hits the WR he will think twice before trying to catch the next ball.

 

Typically one of the two safeties also has responsibilities in supporting the run-defense. He is called the strong safety, and lines up closer to the line of scrimmage.  Troy Polamalu from the Steelers is an example of a perfect safety, he has both the speed to make interceptions and he loves to make big hits.

 

What it takes

 

To be a DB you must be fast and athletic especially the cornerbacks. You have to have ’fluid’ hips, since CBs start every play running backward (backpedaling) but turn and run with the WRs during the play. The corners also have to be confident individuals, since they are virtually alone against their opponent, and any mistake will cost their team 6 points. They have to believe that they can cover their man, and even if the get beat, they must recover quickly – because they will have to cover the same man again on the next drive.

 

The safeties are usually a bit bigger than the CBs, to help defend the running game and hammer WRs. They also have to be good tacticians, to read what the QB sees, and predict the play as it unfolds – then they can break up plays.

 

Finally it is essential that DBs are secure tacklers they may not always punish ball carriers like linebackers, but they have to bring their man down. Failing to do so (especially the safeties, hence the name) will often result in a touchdown for the other team.

 

Overall

 

DB is a fast and fun position to play, especially if you like responsibility and risks.

 

Quotes

 

"It’s not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog."
Archie Griffen, two-time Heisman winner

 

I like to believe that my best hits border on felonious assault.   
-Jack Tatum former
Oakland Raiders Saftey